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#RPGaDay 10: Favorite Tie-In Novel/Game Fiction

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The Official #RPGaDay Meme

The Official #RPGaDay Meme

With post number ten, we’re almost a third of the way done already!

I actually haven’t read that much licensed RPG or game fiction. The first time I ever saw one was at summer camp in sixth grade, where a girl had her nose in a Forgotten Realms book whenever we had down time. I remember asking her about it, but the cover art and characters didn’t appeal to me (it wasn’t pretty enough and there weren’t enough girls). The next time was in seventh grade, when a friend showed me (with much gigglingling) a sex scene from one of the Dragonlance books. Again did not read it (even at her recommendation) because there was no (obvious) strong female protagonist with whom I could identify.

Flash forward to college. I finally was into tabletop RPGs, but people warned me to stay well away from the licensed fiction (I didn’t always listen to their advice). As a college student I was generally too busy to get much leisure reading in, and when I did, it tended to be written by George R. R. Martin, Jacqueline Carey, or Charlaine Harris anyway (guilty pleasure, what can I say?). Dragons of Autumn Twilight and Homeland are on my to-read list, but that list pretty much stretches miles long.

51qx+KnHdPLSo this means my pool for tie-in novel/game fiction is restricted to the following: Dissolution (War of the Spider Queen #1), The Companions (Sundering #1), Game of Tears (Houses of the Blooded), and the Android novels put out by Fantasy Flight Games. You’ll have to forgive me for picking Golem by Mel Odom (Identity #1) as my favorite (and trust that I’m being objective here and not promotional; I didn’t work on it at all, either).

I’d recommend it to anyone who has played the Android board game or the Android: Netrunner LCG, but also to fans of science fiction more generally. It’s no Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep, but I thought the author did a superb job of conveying an inhuman narrator, while also including flashes of humanity through subtext. It’s also a fun crime read, and along with its sequels on Luna and Mars, it provides a good overview of the setting.

What’s your favorite tie-in novel/game fiction?

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